Fiction Stories
Castle Journal

Castle Journal

Monday, 22 April 2019 02:55

Good Morning My Love – by Craig Moon

Good Morning My Love 

By Poet: Craig Moon


Good morning, Good morning my Love
I know I just woke up,
But I want to tell you something,
as I drink my morning cup.
I really love YOU
I do? I do? I do!

And As I dream of day your with me,
I don’t know what I’d do.
So this is my way of showing you,
I believe our dreams will come true.
As I wrote this little poem to say,
I love YOU I love YOU I love YOU.
I do, I do, I do!

And may the smile that you get,
when you feel the warmth it brings,
stay with you all day,
As I know we will be happy
for the rest of our loving days….

Monday, 22 April 2019 02:49

Poem : I promise

I Promise

unknown poet 


I promise to always raise you up,
Whenever you are down,
I promise to wipe away your tears,
When you need them to flow out,
I promise to keep you smiling,
To show the world your light,
I promise to be your strength,
Whenever you need somewhere to lean,
I promise I will be your voice,
When the words don’t come to you,
I promise to be your eyes,
When you are unable to see,
I promise to be your ears,
When you cannot hear,
I promise to always be real to you,
When you are in need of the truth,
I promise to help you chase your dream,
When you feel they are too large,
I promise to be your smile,
When you ca’t help but frown,
I promise to listen,
When you need to speak,
I promise you my heart,
Whenever you need love,
I promise you my love,
Forever and always.

By : Tina Jeffery

Painter FRANCISCO DE ZURBARÁN 1598 – August 27, 1664

Saint Serapion or The Martyrdom of Saint Serapion is his masterpiece at all , it is painted in a 1628 oil on canvas painting by the Spanish artist Francisco Zurbarán (1598–1664). The work was commissioned by the Mercedarian Order to hang in the De Profundis (funerary chapel) hall of their monastery in Seville (now Museum of Fine Arts of Seville). Zurbarán is noted for his portrayals of penitent or martyred monks and saints. Critic Tom Lubbock used this painting to illustrate a difference in the way the martyrdom of two different saints were depicted. He contrasted the understated and calm depiction of St. Serapion's violent death, with the equally or more violent death of the Jesuit priest and martyr Saint Edmund Campion (1540–1581) who was publicly hanged, drawn and quartered in London in December 1581.

The art critic draws a comparison in the manner of depiction of Campion's death and that of Saint Serapion of Algiers (1179–1240), a Mercedarian friar who fought in the Third Crusade of 1196 and was later martyred.

Saint Serapion is depicted by Zurbarán in a quasi-crucified pose, standing with each hand bound by ropes and chain to an overhead horizontal pole. According to Michael Brenson of the New York Times, his head "has shifted from the realm of the robe to the realm of the cape, which supports the head and seems to have the potential to lift it to the sky".

The painting stops at the figure's knee level, while the strain placed on his arms is indicated by the heavy hanging folds of the drapes of the cloth hanging from left shoulder and right outstretched arm.The saint is identified by text on a small note placed to the left of his chest area.

 

Francisco Zurbarán is known for the forceful, realistic use of chiaroscuro in his paintings. He was devoted to an artistic expression of religion and faith; and most of his best known works are religious paintings capable of evoking intense feelings of devotion. He also created several still life paintings including the renowned work Still-life with Lemons, Oranges and Rose. Along with El Greco and Diego Velázquez, Zurbaran is one of the most celebrated artists of the Spanish Golden Age.

 

A team of researchers from the University of California Los Angeles have created a unique device that can generate electricity from snowfall, science media report, citing a paper published in the journal Nano Technology.

The device is basically a vastly improved weather station, which, in addition to measuring how much snow is falling at any given time and what direction and speed the wind is blowing at, can convert the snow power utilizing the principles of static electricity generation.

The researchers have called their creation a snow-based triboelectric nanogenerator, or a snow TENG, and the senior author of the paper, chemistry and biochemistry professor Richard Kaner, explains it as follows: "Static electricity occurs from the interaction of one material that captures electrons and another that gives up electrons. You separate the charges and create electricity out of essentially nothing."

In fact, it’s a little bit more than nothing. Snowflakes carry a positive charge, while silicon, which was used for the device’s surface, is negatively charged. When snow falls on the silicone surface, the contact generates an electric charge and the device captures it.

It sounds deceptively simple but the creators of the device did not go straight for silicone. "While snow likes to give up electrons, the performance of the device depends on the efficiency of the other material at extracting these electrons," explains the co-author of the study, postdoctoral researcher Maher El-Kady, as quoted by Nano Magazine. "After testing a large number of materials including aluminum foils and Teflon, we found that silicone produces more charge than any other material."

While the state in which the device came into existence will hardly be the best place for its deployment, there are many parts of the world where snow falls frequently and where the show TENG could potentially have a future as power generator. But the more fascinating part is that, according to El-Kady, the device could be added to solar panels and help boost their efficiency.

Solar panels have no problem with cold weather—in fact they operate more efficiently in colder weather because heat interferes with their operation. But they do have a problem with snow cover. PV panels convert sunlight into power and if their access to sunlight is blocked by a snow buildup, they cannot operate.

Even though solar panel arrays are mounted at an angle so rain and snow slide down the panels, freeing the access to sunlight to the surface, with heavy snowfalls this becomes irrelevant and the panels’ efficiency rate drop steeply. This problem recently came to the fore in the U.S., in states that experienced some pretty harsh winter weather complete with blizzards and snowstorms that effectively brought down the efficiency rates of some solar farms to zero temporarily.

This small device, the snow TENG could solve this problem for the solar power industry, making the panels reliable regardless of the weather and expanding solar’s reach in previously unattractive locations where there’s little sun but lots of snow, combining the benefits of cold weather and static electricity.

By Irina Slav 

copyright for Oilprice.com

 

Monday, 22 April 2019 02:09

Why Are Natural Gas Prices Crashing?

By Nick Cunningham

Shrugging off low levels of storage, natural gas prices have continued to plunge.

The U.S. entered this past winter with natural gas supplies at a 15-year low. Paltry levels of gas in storage, just ahead of the peak winter demand season, pushed prices up to the highest level in four years. A cold snap in November led to a jump of around 30 percent in a week, an increase so fast and so quick that it forced at least one trading firm out of business. By mid-November, prices had climbed as high as $4.80/MMBtu.

Worryingly, the rest of winter still lay ahead. Gas supplies in storage were at their lowest levels in a decade and a half, and demand had steadily increased year-after-year as gas-fired power plants replaced shuttered coal plants. The surge in LNG exports and petrochemicals also amounted to a new source of demand that didn’t exist in its current form only a few years ago. To top it off, there were several rounds of extreme cold that swept across the North American continent, forcing millions of people to crank up the heat.

Yet, despite that backdrop, prices shockingly fell back rather quickly. A few weeks after the November price spike, Henry Hub spot prices dropped below $4/MMBtu. By February, prices fell below $3/MMBtu and remained there, with the market eyeing the end of the winter demand season. Now, with temperatures rising, prices recently plunged as low as $2.50/MMBtu.

 

However, the price decline comes even as storage remains remarkably tight. Natural gas inventories stood at 1,247 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 12. Notably, despite the large increase of 92 Bcf from the week earlier, gas inventories were still 414 Bcf below the five-year average, and also at multi-year lows for the time of year.

 

Why are prices hovering close to their lowest levels in years, even though inventories have been decimated.

The answer largely comes down to record levels of production, with output continuing to rise on an ongoing basis. Analysts and gas traders have largely shrugged off low storage levels, expecting that the “injection season” – the months between April and November when demand is seasonally soft – will see storage levels fill up quickly, replenishing depleted stocks.

‘‘This is a very bad development here’’ for gas futures, Bob Yawger, director of the futures division at Mizuho Securities USA, told Bloomberg in an interview. ‘‘This is below the multi-year low and we are basically in no man’s land right now.’’

He we on to say ‘‘We have just a lot of gas production in this country,’’, adding that ‘‘Storage is in fact pretty far behind last year, but you can have as much gas as you want and as soon as you want it. That’s what’s killing the market.’’

The Marcellus and Utica Shales (classified by the EIA as the “Appalachia Region”) continue to pump out the nation’s largest amount of gas, with production above 30,000 million cubic feet per day. Output is expected to rise by another 353 million cubic feet per day in May, according to the EIA’s Drilling Productivity Report.

The Permian is adding huge volumes of new supply as well, a byproduct of the oil drilling frenzy. The Permian is now the U.S.’ second largest shale gas producer, expected to top 14,000 million cubic feet per day next month.

However, much of the Permian’s natural gas is going up in smoke because there is not enough pipeline capacity to move all of the gas to market.

The gas glut in the Permian has become so acute that prices recently crashed deep into negative territory. The state has relatively lax standards on flaring, allowing producers to simply burn off gas they can’t capture. Permian drillers were flaring gas at the rate equivalent to the entire residential demand in the state of Texas at the end of 2018, according to Bloomberg. Surely, the volumes of gas going up into the air have climbed since then.

Still, with the Permian and Marcellus adding record gas supply, along with a revived Haynesville Shale, the U.S. continues to break new records for gas output. That means that prices have little chance of climbing significantly higher in the short run.

Sources and copyright: of Oilprice.com

By Irina Slav

 

The predictive powers of artificial intelligence could help scientists bring nuclear fusion closer to actually working, researchers from Princeton and Harvard working with the Department of Energy hope.

The team, working at the DoE’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, says they have applied deep learning techniques to computers in order to be able to forecast sudden outages in the reactors used for nuclear fusion that can halt the energy-generating reaction.

The implications of a success here could be major: nuclear fusion can theoretically supply emissions-free electric power indefinitely. However, making the leap from theoretical to practical has proved challenging.

Nuclear fusion, unlike fission, which is what takes place in traditional reactors, involves smashing particles together and turning them into plasma to generate energy. This takes place in what is called a magnetic fusion machine, or a tokamak. The tokamak produces magnetic fields that keep the superhot plasma inside and keep it moving—and hot—but controlling it for ever-longer periods of time and making it move faster to produce more energy has been a challenge.

Many believe we will never be able to make nuclear fusion happen, but researchers are not giving up. Computer technology is a natural ally to scientists in this quest for infinite clean power, but the presence of data to feed into the computers has proved crucial.

The Princeton and Harvard scientists used data from two fusion reactors: the Department of Energy’s DIII-D National Fusion Facility in California, operated by General Atomics, and the Joint European Torus tokamak in the UK. What the team learns about predicting outages will be applied to the largest tokamak that is currently in construction in the ITER project in Europe. It may just help solve fusion’s biggest problem: why the particle smashing sometimes stops. If this problem is solved, the world could see a working nuclear reactor in less than 20 years, although many scientists and observers remain skeptical.

Source and copyright  for Oilprice.com

By Henning Gloystein

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Oil prices rose by 1 percent on Monday, with Brent hitting its highest level since November, driven up by a report the United States is preparing to announce that all imports of Iranian oil will have to end or be subject to sanctions.


Brent crude futures were at a November 2018 high of $72.70 per barrel at 0100 GMT, up 1 percent from their last close.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $64.70 per barrel, up 1 percent from their previous settlement.

The United States is preparing to announce on Monday that all buyers of Iranian oil will have to end their imports shortly or be subject to U.S. sanctions, a Washington Post columnist reported on Sunday.

Reuters was unable to independently verify the report. A State Department spokesman declined to comment.

The U.S. reimposed sanctions in November on exports of Iranian oil after President Donald Trump unilaterally pulled out of a 2015 nuclear accord between Iran and six world powers.

Washington, however, granted Iran's eight main buyers of oil, mostly in Asia, waivers to the sanctions which allowed them limited purchases for half-a-year.

The report comes amid an oil market that is already relatively tight.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will announce "that, as of May 2, the State Department will no longer grant sanctions waivers to any country that is currently importing Iranian crude or condensate", the Post's columnist Josh Rogin said, citing two State Department officials that he did not name.

"The path of least resistance remains higher (for oil prices)," said Stephen Innes, head of trading at SPI Asset Management, pointing to Saudi supply cuts, a decline in the U.S. rig count and supply disruptions from Libya to Venezuela as reasons for a tight market.

U.S. energy firms last week reduced the number of oil rigs operating by two, to 825, General Electric Co's Baker Hughes energy services firm said in its weekly report on Thursday.

Outside the United States, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has led supply cuts since the start of the year aimed at tightening global oil markets and to propping up crude prices.

Brent prices have risen by more than a third this year, while WTI has climbed more than 40 percent over the same period.

source:Euronews-Reuters

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